East Budleigh

The Birthplace of Sir Walter Raleigh

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Village History

The settlement of East Budleigh dates back a thousand years to the reign of Alfred the Great, known then as the Royal Manor of Bodeleia. This was a most important part of  the Budley Hundred, extending to Withycombe and Littleham, across to Salcombe Regis

causing riotous behaviour. This did not find favour with the village elders and in 1600 the Sunday Market was suppressed and moved to Mondays. There were difficult times as well. In 1347 boats returning from Spain were captured by pirates and Budley lost 141 men, an enormous tragedy for the town.

along the coast and seven miles inland. In the centre, the jewel in the crown, was Budley Towne and Budley Haven.

 East Budleigh, as it is now called, was a most prestigious town and a bustling port. Yes East Budleigh was the original town and Budleigh Salterton a desolate empty place, just a collection of huts used by the workers panning for salt. Nearby Budley Haven was a fine port serving the Continent, with a thriving export trade in wool, a main industry in Devon in Medieval times. Alas the river Otter gradually silted up, despite many valiant attempts to maintain the navigation and the trade moved around the coast to the river Exe.

  Life in those days must have been hard but interesting.  Every Sunday they used to hold a market alongside the Church wall and down the High Street.  Stalls were set up and the local people sold their farm produce, visiting peddlers would bring trinkets, lace and ale flowed freely